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Charlotte Haynes, 24, Solihull

January 20th, 2010 · No Comments

Charlotte Haynes, 24, Solihull

CHARLOTTE HAYNES, 24, FROM SOLIHULL WITH 10-WEEK-OLD BABY REBECCA

Charlotte lives in Solihull with daughter Rebecca. Charlotte really enjoys playing netball, going swimming and spending lots of time with her new arrival.

Please explain why you’ve chosen to breastfeed?
I made the decision to breastfeed very early in my pregnancy, as soon as I found out that I was going to have a baby. I have chosen to breastfeed Rebecca because I know that it is the very best thing for her.

What did the people around you think of your decision to breastfeed – eg partner, parents, friends, family?
Very proud! My mum had not been able to successfully breastfeed me but was a great support. My friends think that it’s great also and really support me when I need to feed in public.

What advice would you give to mums whose partner/friends/parents disapprove of breastfeeding?
That’s crazy! It’s the best for your baby and sooo easy! No bottles to sterelise, just put your baby on and away you go!

Do you think that there are any drawbacks to breastfeeding? If so, what are they?
Wet bras! (sorry, too much information!) And to start off with, you might get sore nipples.

What general advice would you give to expectant mums considering breastfeeding?
Go for it! Get all the advice and support that you can from the maternity ward staff, community midwife, health visitors and breastfeeding coordinators. It is ‘different’ and the first week is all about getting you and your baby used to feeding. Go with it, it’s well worth it!

Did you speak to anyone for advice or do any research about feeding, if so, who did you speak to/where did you look for information?
I got a lot of information from my Parentcraft sessions and the excellent support from the maternity ward and Elaine Bates (my local breastfeeding coordinator).

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Danielle Dowling, 17, Solihull

January 20th, 2010 · No Comments

Danielle Dowling, 17, Acocks Green

DANIELLE DOWLING, 17, SOLIHULL, WITH 13-WEEK-OLD BABY EVIE

Danielle lives with daughter Evie. Since giving birth to Evie, Danielle has been spending quality time with her friends, family and new arrival. Once Evie is a little older, Danielle plans to enroll at her local college.

Please explain why you’ve chosen to breastfeed?
I decided to breastfeed Evie whilst I was pregnant, because I know that it’s the very best thing for her.

What did the people around you think of your decision to breastfeed – eg partner, parents, friends, family?
I found that most of the people that I talked to about breastfeeding were encouraging.

What advice would you give to mums whose partner/friends/parents disapprove of breastfeeding?
That there’s NOTHING wrong with it! Breastfeeding is natural!

What general advice would you give to expectant mums considering breastfeeding?
I really think that breastfeeding helps you to bond with your baby. There are other benefits too though, breastfeeding has helped me to lose my baby weight quickly and Evie gets less wind than she would have had, if I had bottle fed.

Do you think that there are any drawbacks to breastfeeding? If so, what are they?
No! Not at all.

Did you speak to anyone for advice or do any research about feeding, if so, who did you speak to/where did you look for information?
I had lots of advice from my mom and my health visitor about why it’s best for me and my baby. My boyfriend has been really encouraging too.

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How to feed your baby without showing your boobs

October 26th, 2009 · No Comments

Even though breastfeeding is the most natural thing in the world, it can take a while to get used to getting your boobs out when out shopping or with friends.

Many mums don’t always know where to go, what clothes to wear or even how to lift their top up (or down!) without flashing their boobs. Which often makes them worry about what other people think.

We want to use these posts to explain how to get the confidence to feed anywhere. There’s stuff on how to feed privately and how to wear
clothes that keep your assets covered up. There’s also some really good advice on how to handle those strange people who still think that babies should be fed in the toilet!

However you choose to feed your baby, best of luck. Let us know how you go on by commenting below.

To read on, please click on one of the links below:

Where is the best place to breastfeed?
Do people get funny about breastfeeding?
How to avoid flashing your boobs whilst breastfeeding.

The Be A Star Team.

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Where’s the best place to breastfeed?

October 26th, 2009 · No Comments

Never, ever in a toilet! Imagine asking an adult or a bottlefed baby to have their dinner in the toilet! We don’t think breastfeeding is something you need to hide, but it’s important that you do whatever makes you feel comfortable. Here’s some tips.

Time and place

  • Try and get settled somewhere before your baby gets hungry. If they start crying they might draw more attention to you.
  • In cafés, get a seat that is out of the way. If you have to keep moving your chair, it might upset the baby’s feed.


Breastfeeding friendly places

  • Larger shops are starting to offer mum and baby rooms for breastfeeding.


Find a quiet spot

  • Many young women feel better if they can find somewhere out of the way.
  • Fitting rooms are good.
  • In a café you can sit with your back to the room.
  • Some people even nip out to the car for 10 minutes.

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Click here for more advice on breastfeeding your baby discreetly.

The Be A Star Team.

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Do people get funny about breastfeeding?

October 20th, 2009 · No Comments

We don’t understand how anyone could have a problem with a mum feeding her baby. But there are still some people who give strange looks and make comments. The main thing is to not let anyone stop you doing what’s best for you and your baby.

Be strong

  • There’s lots of ways you can deal with these people. The important thing is not to get stressed about it – it’s not good for you or your baby.
  • Ignore them completely – they’re not worth it.
  • Tell the manager that you are being harassed.
  • Make a joke about the situation.
  • Calmly explain that it’s the best thing for your baby and completely natural.


Be confident

  • The more you do it, the more comfortable you will feel.
  • It might be a big deal for you, but most people don’t even notice.
  • Remember why you’re doing it – for your baby! The most important thing in your life. Who cares what other people think?


Be proud

  • Breastfeeding is an amazing achievement – be proud of it!

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Click here for more advice on breastfeeding your baby discreetly.

The Be A Star Team.

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How to avoid flashing your boobs whilst breastfeeding

October 20th, 2009 · No Comments

Breastfeeding is nothing to be embarrassed about! But when you’re out and about, knowing what clothes to wear and feeding positions to use can help you feel more confident before you actually leave the house.

Clothes that work

  • Any tops that unbutton from the bottom.
  • Stretchy tops that pull up.
  • Two piece outfits if you’re going somewhere special.
  • You can now get trendy bras and tops that are made specially for breastfeeding.


Clothes that don’t

  • Shirts that you have to unbutton – they make you feel really exposed.


Hints and tips

  • Jackets, shirts over a vest top and cardigans – these can be used as a screen and will cover almost everything!
  • Scarves and baby blankets are also good at keeping things under wraps.
  • Use a sling or a pouch – they make carrying the baby easier on your back and cover most of your boob as well.
  • Practise! The more you do it, the better you get at getting baby latched on quickly. You can do this without even leaving your living room!

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Click here for more advice on breastfeeding your baby discreetly.

The Be A Star Team.

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Cumbria Local Support Details

October 13th, 2009 · No Comments

North and West Cumbria

Breastfeeding Information and Support

National Breastfeeding Helpline
Calls are answered locally by
trained mothers. 9.30am – 9.30pm
www.breastfeeding.nhs.uk
Tel: 0300 100 0212

Postnatal ward West Cumberland
Tel: 01946 523 260

Maternity ward Carlisle
Tel: 01228 523 444 Ext 4269

NCT Breastfeeding Counsellor
Anne Marie Steel—West Cumbria
Tel: 07900 904 054

The National Childbirth Trust (NCT)
NCT breastfeeding line: 0300 330 0771
NCT pregnancy & birth line: 0300 330 0772
NCT postnatal line: 0300 330 0773

Special Care Baby Unit
West Cumbria: 01946 693 181 Ext 4248
Carlisle: 01228 523 444 Ext 4271
(For special care babies only)

Helpful Numbers

Association of Breastfeeding Mothers (24 hrs)
Tel: 08444 122 949

La Leche League (24hrs)
Tel: 0845 120 2918

Cumbria PCT
Penrith
Tel: 01768 245 317

Cumbria County Council
Children and Family Information Service
Tel: 08457 125 737

The Brook Advisory Helpline
Free and confidential advice and contraception
www.brook.org.uk
Freephone: 0808 802 1234

Sexual Health Clinics
Carlisle: 01228 814 814 / 591 986
West Cumbria: 01900 705 050

Family Planning
Hilltop Heights
Tel: 01228 608 028 or 0845 122 8690

Drug & Alcohol
Carlisle: 01228 88 22 99
West Cumbria: 01946 599 413

Health Visitors (Carlisle)
Hilltop Heights: 01228 608 045
Petterill Bank: 01228 547 137

Health Visitors (West Cumbria)
Workington: 01900 706 153/152

Social Services—children/adults
Whitehaven: 01946 852 852
Workington: 01900 706 325

Carlisle (children): 01228 226 877
Carlisle (adult): 01228 22 7000

Breastfeeding Groups

Carlisle and District

For more information on the groups below, contact:
Infant Feeding Coordinator
Helen Ferris—Carlisle
Tel: 01228 814 269 / 07879 632 018

Harraby Petterill Bank School
Mon 1pm – 2.30pm

Wigton Low Moor Church Hall
Tue 10am – 11.30am

Belah Community Centre
Thur 2pm – 3.30pm

Morton Manor Community Centre
Fri 1pm – 2.30pm

Longtown Children’s Centre
Fri 10am – 11.30am

West Cumbria

For more information on the groups below, contact:
Infant Feeding Advisor
Sharon Rogan—West Cumbria
Tel: 01946 523 260 / 07733 361 687

Methodist Church Hall, Cockermouth
Wed 10.30am – 12pm

Cockermouth Leisure Centre
Mon 10am -12pm

Maryport Child and Family Centre
Fri 1pm – 2.30pm

Workington Community Hospital
Fri 1.30pm – 3pm

Valley School, Whitehaven
Tue 1pm – 2.30pm

Seascale School
Mon 1.45pm – 3.15pm

St Mary’s and St Michael’s Egremont
Wed 11am -12pm

Cleator Moor Children’s Centre
Thur 1pm – 2.30pm

Children’s Centres: West Cumbria

Howgill Family Centre
Tel: 01946 62681

Cleator Moor Family Centre
Tel:  01946 62681

Egremont Children’s Centre
Tel: 01946 62681

Distington Community Centre
Tel: 01900 873699

Frizington Family Centre
Frizington Nursery School
Tel: 01946 62681

Minto Centre
Tel: 01900 873699

Children’s Centres: Carlisle and District

Barnardos Carlisle West
Tel: 01228 223417

Barnardos Carlisle South
Tel: 01228 625937

Aspatria Children’s Centre
Tel: 016973 22777

Wigton Children’s Centre
Tel: 016973 49555

Silloth Childrens Centre
Tel: 0845 5436909

South Cumbria

Breastfeeding Information and Support

National Breastfeeding Helpline
Calls are answered locally by
trained mothers. 9.30am – 9.30pm
www.breastfeeding.nhs.uk
Tel: 0300 100 0212

Furness Breastfeeding Helpline
Tel: 01229 582 464
6pm – 11pm

Cumbria PCT
Penrith
Tel: 01768 245 317

NHS Direct
www.nhs.uk
Tel: 0845 46 47

Association of Breastfeeding Mothers
Tel: 08444 122 949 (24 hrs)

La Leche League (24hrs)
Tel: 0845 120 2918

National Childbirth Trust (NCT)
Breastfeeding Line
Tel: 0300 33 00 771

Cumbria County Council Children
and Family Information Service
Tel: 08457 125 737

Sexual Health
Tel: 01229 404 464

Drug and Alcohol Services
Tel: 01229 615 651 or 07775 917 443

Stop Smoking Midwife
Tel: 07768 483 394

Home Start
Support for parents or carers with children under 5
Tel: 01229 824 411

Domestic Violence
Tel: 01229 838 746

CONNEXIONS
Young parent support
Tel: 01229 824 052

The Brook Advisory Helpline
Free and confidential advice and contraception
www.brook.org.uk
Freephone: 0808 802 1234

Postnatal Wellbeing Support
Tel: 01229 820 029

Family Planning
Tel: 01229 845 953

Social Services
Tel: 01229 407 894

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Breastfeeding is dad’s decision too

September 21st, 2009 · No Comments

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EXCLUSIVE

Pregnant mums are more likely to breastfeed when dads get involved in the decision. Whilst the final say needs to be with the mum, blokes that take the time to find out the facts about breastfeeding whilst she’s pregnant make their partners feel more confident about doing things naturally.

GET INVOLVED
Dads that take a backseat and leave the mum to decide by herself are more likely to miss out on the many benefits that breastfeeding will give to their baby.

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Top tips on becoming a dad

September 21st, 2009 · No Comments

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If there’s one thing that separates the men from the boys, it’s how they deal with being a dad. Here’s some top tips to help you step up to the plate.

1. You can’t really break the baby!
Don’t be afraid to pick your baby up for a cuddle! There’s a knack to it when they are really little, but don’t worry, your instincts as a dad will
kick in.

2. Don’t Panic.
You might feel like you’re having a heart attack when the midwives, doctors, and health visitors disappear and leave you holding the baby. Prepare for this in your mind. Stay calm, work together and remember that help is always on hand.

3. Know where to turn.
Keep a list of important numbers next to the phone, so that when panic does set in you can get help or advice quickly. As well as the midwife, doctor, health visitor (and your mum), include friends with children, your antenatal teacher and the breastfeeding helplines.

4. Be patient 
New mums have a lot to cope with—lots more than you! Get ready to be patient and supportive at all costs. She’s carried the baby for 9 months, given birth and is now worried about being mum—she deserves to be a bit narky! More seriously, read up on post-natal depression. Get to know the signs and get help quickly if you’re worried.

5. Breast is best
Breastfeeding will give your baby the best start possible, but make sure you don’t pressure your partner. Make the decision together and make sure she knows that you’ll be there to support her if she decides to give it a go.

6. Fill the cupboards
Stock up your cupboards and freezer with plenty of food to make quick and easy meals. You’ll have very little time on your hands for a while and meals prepared in advance are great for saving precious minutes (and reducing washing up!)

7. What about sex?
In the early days, it’s unlikely that sex will be on the agenda at all.  She’s likely to be far too tired, sore, and self-conscious about her body. Take this on board and help her to feel loved and attractive again. Give her lots of cuddles, and tell her how beautiful she is and how proud of her
you are.

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Girls don’t need to flash boobs to breastfeed!

September 21st, 2009 · No Comments

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BREASTFEEDING BABY WITHOUT SHOWING HER BOOBS.

Like most blokes, you’ll flinch at the thought of your girl whipping out her boobs (your boobs!) in front of other people. Add in the possibility that those other people could be your mates or your dad and you’re stomping round the room pounding your chest. Well, there’s no need to panic. There are lots of ways she can make sure your baby  gets a mouthful, without giving your mates an eyeful.

It’s as simple as wearing the right clothes and using the right positions. There’s a leaflet available devoted to this topic. And because she’s probably worried about it as well, you could score some serious brownie points by picking one up for her. Ask your midwife or ring Salford Family Information Service on 0800 195 5565.

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